Review of Houses and Whispers at Prefix ICA

April 14, 2017

I want to share this beautiful and respectful review by Terence Dick of the two major works in my show at Prefix ICA in Toronto.

See the review here, or read below:

There are some works of art that trigger – much to the consternation, I imagine, of the creator – only a sliver of the possible interpretations. The artist’s intention could encompass history, philosophy, and physics, but all you see is a something that reminds you of your grandparents or a metaphor for neoliberalism or a picture of a galaxy exploding. And then that’s all you see because it’s sufficient, because it means something to you. Responding to art in this highly personal way does a disservice to the work because it locks the reading down to a singular perception, but it’s also a tribute to the degree to which art can pierce through the noise of all that surrounds us and mark a moment of unambiguous connection. Great literature, according to David Foster Wallace, makes you feel unalone. He was talking intellectually, emotionally, and spiritually, but any art has the potential to take you out of yourself, however momentarily, when you recognize something you’ve known or felt or sensed hanging there on the wall in front of you.

Gunilla Josephson’s mini-survey exhibition at Prefix ICA, titled Houses and Whispers and curated by Stuart Reid, contains a couple such moments for me and it is difficult to think of it otherwise – in part because the impressions are so strong, but also because I want to savour those impressions and not dilute them with an impersonal (that is, professional) account of what the exhibition has to offer. The Big Goodbye is a wall-sized video projection shot from a hot air balloon as it travels over Stockholm. Nestled within the half-hour ride are a couple brief angel sightings and a few gentle explosions. It might be the artist’s hometown and the voiceover hints at some kind of reverie, but all I see is the characteristic urban planning of Northern Europe and I’m transported back to the summers I spent with family in Germany when I was a kid. Perhaps it’s the bike paths or the low-rise apartments. Either way, it’s enough to send me down memory lane. Which, serendipitously, is not too far from what the artist wanted to evoke.

There’s more to remember in the expression and skin tone of the crystal-eyed matriarch in Mommy’s Crystal Tears. Something about her cheekbones resembles my own mother and so the die is cast. Once again I’m bound to one vision and it is memory combined with intimacy that compels me. I usually divorce myself from such exclusive readings, but for this show I’ll indulge myself if only to prove a point. I pass over the other works with a cursory glance and return to these two for further reminiscence and reflection.

Terence Dick is a freelance writer living in Toronto. His art criticism has appeared in Canadian Art, BorderCrossings, Prefix Photo, Camera Austria, Fuse, Mix, C Magazine, Azure, and The Globe and Mail. He is the editor of Akimblog.

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Gunilla Josephson: Houses and Whispers at Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art, Toronto

February 14, 2017

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Houses and Whispers is showing at Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art, in Toronto, from February 16 to April 22, 2017. 401 Richmond Street, Suite 124.

See more at www.prefix.ca/exhibitions/gunilla-josephson-houses-and-whispers

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‘Gunilla Josephson: Houses and Whispers’ review in Long Exposure Magazine

December 1, 2016

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Review of Gunilla Josephson: Houses & Whispers at Rodman Hall in Long Exposure Magazine Issue 4.

Read the full article below

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‘Gunilla Josephson: Houses and Whispers’ review in The Sound of St Catharines

November 26, 2016

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Review of Gunilla Josephson: Houses & Whispers at Rodman Hall in The Sound of St Catharines.

Read the full article here.

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Canadian Art Must-Sees This Week: Houses and Whispers

September 15, 2016

Gunilla Jospehson: Houses and Whispers at Rodman Hall Art Centre in St Catharines is included in the ‘CANADIAN ART Must-Sees This Week Sep 15-21’ listing.

canadianart.ca/must-sees/must-sees-week-september-15-21-2016

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Gunilla Josephson: Houses and Whispers. Rodman Hall Art Centre, St Catharines

August 31, 2016

GUNILLA JOSEPHSON
Houses and Whispers

Curated by Stuart Reid

September 17 to December 31, 2016
Opening Reception: Saturday, September 17, 3pm
Hot Talk: Saturday, September 17, 2pm

Houses and Whispers, a survey of recent video work by Gunilla Josephson, acknowledges the subtle energies, quiet voices of residual, intermural memories. The assemblage of multi-channel video installations, distributed through the many rooms and parlours of historic Rodman Hall, infuses the old house with flickering presence. Taking on the narrative arc of a grand voyage, many of the works chart a passage through the fleeting, at times abstract, glimpses of life as a sequence of operatic moments, at once universal and intimately personal. Houses and Whispers marks a departure of sorts in Josephson’s practice—a move away from a linear filmic narrative towards sustained video portraiture as a means of suspending time for contemplative viewing. The artist writes: “The face, isolated and observed closely over time, with all its minute variations, greater emotional repertoire and its exposed naked presence, becomes a drama in itself. Truth and fiction collapse into each other.”

Image: Gunilla Josephson, production photo from Houses and Whispers, 2015, 6 Channel video. Image: Gunilla Josephson.

https://brocku.ca/rodman-hall/exhibitions/Upcoming

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Symposium – MEETINGS – in Denmark

July 28, 2016

The Sule Farm at Hjerl Hede is one of the topics in TIME, SITE & LORE

 

MEETINGS Mid and West Jutland, Denmark
Commissioned, site specific performance and video art
24-28 October 2016 and 1-10 September 2017

I have been invited to participate in TIME, SITE & LORE, a collaboration between 4 culture-historical museums, 5 Central and West Jutland localities, 5 international artists and ET4U about an artistic interpretation of selected museum objects or stories – contemporary art at the intersection of museological knowledge and local lore.

The participating museums are The Open Air Museum Hjerl Hede (Holstebro), Fur Fossils 55 million years (Skive), Lemvig Museum and Struer Museum. The five sites are Sdr. Lyngvig (Ringkøbing-Skjern), Stenøre – Fur Harbour (Skive), Rom (Lemvig), Humlum and Oddesund North (Struer). The artists are Gigi Scaria (India), Yuval Yairi (Israel), Sadik Kwaish Al Fraji (Iraq / Netherlands), Gunilla Josephson (Sweden / Canada) and Bassem Yousri (Egypt).

The finished video works will be displayed in the museums as part of the Cultural Collaboration in Mid and West Jutland’s festival OFF ROAD 11 April to 6 May 2017. A documentary catalog about the project will be available in both a printed and a web version.

See more at: www.et4u.dk

Supported by: The Danish Ministry of Culture. The municipalities: Herning, Lemvig, Skive, Ringkoebing-Skjern, Ikast- Brande, Holstebro and Struer. Aarhus 2017 European Capital of Culture.

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Participation in upcoming project “2017–1967: contemporary art 50 years after Sculpture ’67”

July 20, 2016

I have been invited to participate in a sesquicentennial project titled “2017–1967: contemporary art 50 years after Sculpture ’67”. Confirmed for September 22 to the end of December, 2017, through Harbourfront Centre in Toronto, the project is designed as a digitally produced survey in video format of Canadian artists and their work, to be available simultaneously in participating venues across Canada. The “2017 Collective”, a group of four artists – Yvonne Lammerich and Ian Carr-Harris, co-curators, with Lee Henderson, video production, and Alex Bowron, publications are launching the project, which will bring together the original 51 artists in the 1967 exhibition with 51 artists working in the years since.

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TSV Honorary lifetime membership award

July 1, 2016

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Shouts of thanks to the wonderful people at Trinity Square Video Toronto for awarding me an honorary lifetime membership!

www.trinitysquarevideo.com

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Whitney Museum of American Art to Screen ‘Ways of Something’

June 28, 2016

Whitney Museum of American Art to screen ‘Ways of Something’, curated by Lorna Mills featuring the work of 114 digital and web artists from around the world, one of which is myself. The project will be part of the exhibition Dreamlands: Immersive Cinema and Art, 1905–2016′ at the Whitney Museum of American Art from October 28th, 2016 to February 5th, 2017.

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Trinity Square Video Master Class

November 9, 2015

I will be running a Video Installation Master Class at Trinity Square Video
November 22 & 29 , 10am-1pm
$85 Non-member. $10 Member / Skills Member

—————————————-

INTRODUCING A NEW PARADIGM IN MEDIA ARTS SKILLS DEVELOPMENT
FOR TRINITY SQUARE VIDEO MEMBERS!

TAKE UNLIMITED WORKSHOPS FOR ONE PRICE!

Starting this November at Trinity Square Video, there is a unique opportunity for artists to extend their practice, learn new skills, practice old ones and participate in workshops without any restriction. For $120 per year – that’s just $10 per month, Trinity Square Video is introducing a Skills Membership. Open to new and existing members who are interested in developing their media arts skills.

After several months of conducting surveys with workshop participants, Trinity came to the conclusion that we need to introduce a new approach for skills development to meet the changing needs of the community. Demand for learning continues to increase but hands on-training is competing with many online and offline sources. Our survey indicates that people want access to training but financial constraints hinder their opportunities. To give choice and flexibility (like Netflix or an all-you-can-eat buffet) one price should allow our members to choose what they want without price being a barrier.

In order to remedy this, Trinity Square Video is now offering a Skills Membership where for the reasonable sum of $10 per month, payable in advance for one year, participants get access to our workshops. By simply paying for the year in advance, Skills Members can take any or as many workshops that catch their interest. If they choose they can take the same workshop multiple times to hone their skills and get more practice. The only requirement is that members must register in advance since space is limited. If you are unable to attend and fail to cancel, you will pay a non-attendance fee of $10 since your seat is at a premium. Skills Members will have access to practice sessions but do not have the ability to rent equipment or media lab time. Skills Members can convert to Producing Members at any time, and will receive a credit to their account (which they can use for rentals or training) if they do so during the first 6 months of their membership.

Producing and Associate members can attend any workshop for $10. If an Associate Member wishes to convert to a Skills Membership they canupgrade their membership for $85. Producing Members who want unlimited skills development plus the ability to rent space in the Media Lab or equipment (including free 4K gear) can upgrade to an ‘I want it all’ level for an additional $75. Trinity offers workshops at a high ratio of instructor to student. Our roster of workshops rotates every quarter, so don’t worry your opportunity to attend a specific course will come around again. This special offer does not include custom workshops or one-on-one training. Workshops will continue to be open to the public at regular pricing.

Contact milada@trinitysquarevideo.com or 416-593-1332 to register.

 

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Ways of Something

October 22, 2015

Ways of Something, Episode 4: Gunilla Josephson, minute 10

I was invited to take part in Ways of Something, Lorna Mills’s update of John Berger’s seminal BBC program WAYS OF SEEING (1972).

Lorna Mills: Ways of Something Episodes 3 & 4 showed at Gene Siskel Film Centre in Chicago
Thursday, Oct 22nd 2015 7:45pm

Featuring the work of 114 digital and web artists from around the world, the project consists of a series of one-minute videos produced in response to Berger’s original insights on art and society. The result, a delirious and revelatory collection of 3D renderings, GIFs, webcam performances, appropriated media, desktop preparations, and websites, describes the cacophonous conditions of art making after the Internet. HD Video. (Amy Beste)

These episodes consider the ways art is used to express status and its role in the aspirational world-making of advertising. Featuring the works of Carine Santi-Weil, Nicolas Sassoon, Tom Sherman, Kim Asendorf & Ole Fach, Rafaela Kino, Alex McLeod, Kate Wilson & Lynne Slater, Aleksandra Domanović, Systaime, Erik Zepka, Adam Ferriss, Rodell Warner & Arnaldo James, Debora Delmar Corp., Brenna Murphy, Nick Briz, Carlos Sáez, Jenn E Norton, Juliette Bonneviot, Luis Nava, Vince McKelvie, Claudia Maté, Evan Roth, Shana Moulton, Sabrina Ratté, Jordan Tannahill, Vasily Zaitsev feat. MON3Y.us, Ann Hirsch. Mert Keskin a.k.a Haydiroket, A. Bill Miller, Alix Desaubiaux, Krystal South, Rachael Archibald, Will Pappenheimer, Dave Greber, Chiara Passa, John Boyle-Singfield, Gunilla Josephson, Melanie Clemmons, Curt Cloninger, Terrell Davis, Morehshin Allahyari, Amy Lockhart, John Marriott, Lilly Handley, Emily Vey Duke, Kate Armstrong, Myfanwy Ashmore, Luke Painter, Aram Bartholl, Elena Garnelo, Lorna Mills, Ellectra Radikal, Nicole Killian, Jacob Chiocci, and Rick Silva.

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String Therapy at Trinity Square Video Nuit Blanche

October 16, 2015

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String Therapy
A suspended filigree made of 3 km kitchen string
13 x 6 x 6 Feet [4 x 2 x 2 m]

A structure created by many hands for many weeks spontaneously and without instructions forming a morphing structure out of nothing but very fine cotton string and ending for Nuit Blanche 2015.

The slowly growing string sculpture mysteriously takes on qualities from nature such as the formation of rhizomes (a continuously growing horizontal underground stem that puts out lateral shoots and adventitious roots at intervals) a term used by the philosopher and psychoanalyst duo Giles Deleuze and Felix Guattari in the 1980s to describe a key concept in their thinking: that each manifestation of an idea is a new way of seeing the world, rather than an extension of an older idea believing that all organisms are predestined to change and so each manifestation of an idea is a new way of seeing the world, rather than an extension of an older idea.

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Russell Smith: For the creative, procrastination can be a work of art

September 19, 2015

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Russel Smith writes about my String Therapy project in the Globe & Mail

Well, now, see, here we are: This is art: We can’t get away from it. Gunilla can’t help herself…

Read the article here.

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